How Many Species Of Birds Available In The Goose Family - wingedfriends.com

How Many Species Of Birds Available In The Goose Family


how many species of birds

According to new research sponsored by the American Museum of Natural History, the world’s bird species number around 18,000, roughly twice as many as previously estimated. The research focuses on “hidden” avian diversity, or birds that appear to be related or interbreed, but are actually separate species. Check out how many species of birds are there in the Goose Family. 

  1. White-fronted Goose

The Greater White-fronted Goose is a stocky brown goose that may be found in the Northern Hemisphere, mostly west of the Mississippi River in North America. It has orange legs and a white stripe down its side, as well as white feathers surrounding its pinkish-orange beak. Wintering in huge flocks in marshes, lakes, and croplands, these geese breed on the northern tundra. Greylag Geese, a commonly farmed species that can be found in small numbers in farms and parks in North America, might be confused with them. This is one of the variants if you are wondering how many species of birds are there.

  1. Snow Goose
A close up of a bird

The Snow Goose has a white body and black wingtips that are scarcely visible on the ground but prominent in flight. A dark line runs alongside the pink bill, which is known as a “grinning patch” or “black lips.” Snow Geese with a dark morph, commonly known as “Blue Geese,” have a white face, dark brown body, and white undertail. A medium-sized goose with a long, broad neck and a heavy beak. This is one of the variants if you are wondering how many species of birds are there. In the fall, juveniles are somewhat smaller than adults, and this may be seen in flocks during the fall and early winter.

  1. Cackling Goose

The Cackling Goose appears to be a smaller form of the common Canada Goose, with which it was long considered a single species. This is one of the variants if you are wondering how many species of birds are there. Cackling Geese and Snow Geese have nearly identical plumage, but Cackling Geese are more delicate. Their sounds are extreme in pitch than when compared to that of Canada Geese. Cackling Geese, like their bigger relatives, graze in huge groups in marshes and fields, frequently mixing with other geese species.

  1. Double-crested Cormorant
A bird that is standing in the grass

The gangly Double-crested Cormorant is a matte-black fishing bird with yellow-orange face skin that looks archaic. Though they resemble a cross between a goose and a loon, they are related to frigatebirds and boobies and are a common sight around fresh and saltwater throughout North America, their wings spread out to dry. This is one of the variants if you are wondering how many species of birds are there. These strong, heavy-boned birds excel in diving for little fish.

  1. Wild Turkey

Wild turkeys are large, chubby birds with long legs, wide, rounded tails, and a small head perched on a long, narrow neck. Turkeys have a dark overall colouration with a bronze-green iridescence to the majority of their feathers. This is one of the variants if you are wondering how many species of birds are there. Their wings are black and prominently banded with white. Their rump and tail feathers are rusty or white in colour. The colour of the naked skin on the head and neck ranges from red to blue to grey. Turkeys move in groups and forage for nuts, berries, insects, and snails on the ground. They scratch the leaf litter out of the way with their powerful feet. Males congregate in clearings in early spring to perform courtship displays. They puff up their body feathers, fan their tails vertically, and strut sluggishly.

Wrapping Up

Birds have long been regarded to be a well-studied group, with more than 95 per cent of their global species diversity estimated to have been described. These are some of the variants if you are wondering how many species of birds are there. According to most checklists used by bird watchers and scientists, there are between 9,000 and 10,000 species of birds. Those figures, however, are based on what is known as the “biological species idea,” which classifies species based on which animals may breed together.

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