10 Aquatic Birds You Need to Know About


aquatic birds

If you love swimming, then this article is going to be a huge hit.

Aqua- what? You may not know the names of these 10 aquatic birds, but they are all around us and play an important role in many ecological systems.  To help get you acquainted with each one, we’ve compiled this list of 10 aquatic birds you need to know about.

1. Great Blue Heron

Aquatic Birds

The great blue heron is one of the largest North American herons and it can be found near fresh or saltwater. It has a wingspan of around 6.5-7.5 feet and a body length of 3.6-4.6 feet. The great blue heron is a beautiful bird with a blue-gray body and a long neck that it often holds in an S-shape. Its diet consists of fish, amphibians, reptiles, small mammals, and birds.

2. American White Pelican

Aquatic Birds

The American white pelican is the second-largest North American bird with a wingspan of 9.2-10.5 feet and a body length of 4.6-5.9 feet. It is all white with black wingtips and it has a large, orange bill. The American white pelican breeds in the northern parts of North America and it can be found near lakes, rivers, and marshes. It feeds on fish, amphibians, and invertebrates.

3. Brown Pelican

The brown pelican is the smallest of the three pelican species found in North America. It has a wingspan of 6.2-7.5 feet and a body length of 3.3-4.3 feet. The brown pelican is brown with a white chest and it has a long, curved bill. It breeds along the coasts of North America and can be found near oceans, bays, and inlets. It feeds on fish, crustaceans, and squid.

4. Double-crested Cormorant

The double-crested cormorant is a medium-sized member of the cormorant family. It has a wingspan of 4.2-5.8 feet and a body length of 2.9-3.9 feet. The double-crested cormorant is black with a yellow throat pouch. It breeds along the coasts of North America and can be found near oceans, bays, lakes, and rivers. It feeds on fish, crustaceans, and mollusks.

5. Great Cormorant

The great cormorant is the largest member of the cormorant family. It has a wingspan of 6-7.5 feet and a body length of 3.6-4.8 feet. The great cormorant is black with a white throat pouch. It breeds along the coasts of North America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. It can be found near oceans, bays, lakes, and rivers. It feeds on fish, crustaceans, and mollusks.

6. Great Egret

The great egret is a large member of the heron family. It has a wingspan of 5.2-6.6 feet and a body length of 3.3-4.7 feet. The great egret is all white with yellow eyes and a black bill. It can be found near freshwater or saltwater. It feeds on fish, amphibians, reptiles, small mammals, and birds.

7. Snowy Egret

The snowy egret is a small member of the heron family. It has a wingspan of 2.6-3.2 feet and a body length of 2-2.4 feet. The snowy egret is all white with black legs and yellow feet. It can be found near freshwater or saltwater. It feeds on fish, amphibians, reptiles, small mammals, and birds.

8. Little Blue Heron

The little blue heron is a small heron found in the wetlands of North America and South America. It is gray or white with a blue head, neck, and breast. The little blue heron feeds on fish, frogs, crabs, and other small aquatic creatures.

9. Green Heron

Among North American herons, green herons are the most widespread and abundant. They can be found in all of the contiguous United States as well as south into Mexico, Central America, and South America. They have even been sighted occasionally in southern Canada. The range also extends to Costa Rica, Cuba, Haiti, and Jamaica. This bird is a year-round resident in most of its range, although some northern birds do migrate south for the winter.

10. Black-crowned Night Heron

A black-crowned night heron is a medium-sized bird that lives in North America, Central America, and much of South America. They live near water, like lakes and the ocean. The night herons are mostly active at night so they can hunt during the day. These birds have long legs and sharp claws to help them catch their prey.

Subscribe to our monthly Newsletter
Subscribe to our monthly Newsletter